Summer research opportunity in Green Building Environments at UMBC

NSF REU 2014

Research Experiences for Undergraduates
in Green Building Environments at UMBC

May 28 – August 15, 2014

New emerging “smart plugs” embed a micro-controller and low-power communication device that allows you to monitor the power consumption of individual devices (e.g., microwave, coffee machine, laptop) plugged into power sockets, and communicate such power consumption information over a wireless network to a central monitoring station. Such devices could lead to substantial savings of energy & money by enabling Internet-based monitoring & real-time control of the behavior of individual appliances. This project will use real-life microcontroller kits (ACME Plugs from Moteware) & real-life building measurement data to explore whether such measurement-based monitoring can be used to

  • Develop Smart Circuit Breaker — i.e., to lessen the burden of the user of plugging each and every appliance/device in the building with a smart plug; we will investigate connecting multiple devices together with an individual smart plug/smart circuit breaker and design a smart circuit breaker using energy metering chip (ADE7753), AC/DC power supply, Microcontroller with radio (TI MSP430F16 and Cypress Powerline Communications (PLC) modem) and solid state AC relay (Sharp S216SE1) etc.
  • Profile individual devices — i.e., use NILM (non-intrusive load monitoring) data analytics algorithm on the time-series of power consumption traces to infer the type of plugged-in device (e.g., distinguish between a laptop & a coffeemaker), thereby building a dynamic catalog of the types & number of devices connected by a consumer.
  • Predict the power consumption of individual rooms — i.e., using the past history of the power consumption of individual devices to create predictive inferences of the usage patterns for individual devices (e.g., learn that the individual switches on a dehumidifier for ~3 hrs every Thu).
  • Receive $4,500 stipend, free on-campus housing
  • Access to university resources, Travel support to UMBC, Unique research experience

Please send your CV (include any relevant experience) and unofficial transcript to Dr. Nirmalya Roy at .

IEEE student branch to hold Arduino workshops starting 4/1

Arduino Workshops from UMBC commonvision on Vimeo

TL;DR: UMBC’s IEEE student branch will hold free weekly workshops on Arduino starting next week. Register at http://bit.ly/OVzA1f.

The Arduino micro-controller is a great device for anyone who wants to learn more about technology. It is used in a variety of fields in research and academia as well as by hobbyists. Arduino can be used for projects ranging from quadcopters to thermal cyclers  and even wearable electronics. Here is more information about the Arduino.

The workshops are intended for ANY student from ANY major and only require a basic understanding of basic programming concepts such as if-statements and loops. The majority of the code will be provided.

The Arduino workshops are offered on a weekly basis at two levels: Level 1 for those new to Arduino and Level 2 for students who have completed Level 1 or have a basic familiarity with Arduino. The Level 1 workshop is offered on Tuesday and Wednesday from 7:00pm to 9:00pm starting the week of April 1st. You may select to participate in either our Tuesday lecture or Wednesday lecture. The Level 2 workshop is only offered on Thursday from 7:00pm to 9:00pm starting the week of April 1st as well. For both workshops, you will need to bring your laptop and you must able to download the Arduino IDE.

Register at http://bit.ly/OVzA1f. Seats are limited. Contact Sekar Kulandaivel () with questions about registration, downloading the IDE, or anything else.

Council of Computer Majors meets Noon Wed 3/26 in MP 008

wikipedia

The next Council of Computing Majors (CCM) will be at Noon this Wednesday, March 26th, in Math/Psychology 008. One of our group members, Patrick McElvaney, will give a presentation about a new CCM project: using the Raspberry Pi and photo-receptors to analyze water in the Chesapeake watershed. His talk will provide an overview of the installation of sensing equipment, specific details on how the photo-receptors can differentiate between organic and inorganic compounds, and information on how other students can get involved.

The CCM is a student organization for undergraduate computer science and computer engineering majors as well as other students interested in computing. If you are interested in starting your own project, please come and speak with any of the officers after the meeting.

Earn $5500 in the 2014 Google Summer of Code program

If you have good software skills and are still looking for a summer internship, check out the 2014 Google Summer of Code program. You can earn $5500 by coding for an open source software project this summer. You will probably work remotely, but in close collaboration with a mentor at one of over 100 participating organizations. To maximize your chances, explore the organizations and find one that needs your skills. Details here; apply by Friday, March 21.

Google Code Jam registration open, qualification round Fri. 4/11

gcj

Google Code Jam 2014 Registration is open and the qualification round starts on Friday, April 11, 2014. Google Code Jam is an international programming competition hosted and administered by Google. The competition began in 2003 as a means to identify top engineering talent for potential employment at Google.

The competition consists of a set of algorithmic problems which must be solved in a fixed amount of time. Competitors may use any programming language and development environment to obtain their solutions. More than 45,000 coders registered to compete last year and the winner, Ivan Miatselski won the $15,000 grand prize.

If you are interested in finding out more, see the Google Code Jam quick start guide and try some of the practice problems from past competitions. The first qualification round starts on April 11 and the finals will take place in Los Angeles on August 15.

Hands-on Raspberry Pi workshop, 2-4 Friday March 7, ITE240

The UMBC Council of Computing Majors will hold its first hands-on Raspberry Pi workshop from 2:00-4:00 this Friday, March 7, in ITE240.

The Raspberry Pi is a $35 credit-card-sized, single-board computer that runs a version of Unix. Originally developed for teaching computer programming to children, it is now being used in many useful and exciting applications, from near-space weather balloons to baby monitors to media servers. The possibilities are only limited by your imagination.

The initial workshop will cover the Raspberry Pi, its Raspbian Unix OS, and how to program it using Python for real-world applications. There will be 20 Pi computers for participants to use. The workshop is designed so freshman and non-computer science majors can attend and participate. If you know anyone who would be interested in attending, please send them the link and information!

Space is limited, so sign up to reserve a seat.  Intermediate and advanced workshops will follow later in the semester. See the Pi FAQ for general information on the Pi and Raspbian for information on its operating system.

For more information, contact CCM president Austin Murdock ().

Prof. Marie desJardins receives NCWIT Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award

The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) has selected CSEE professor Marie desJardins as one of four awardees of the 2014 NCWIT Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award. The award comes with a gift to UMBC of $5,000, sponsored by AT&T that can be used to further Professor desJardins mentoring activities. The award will be presented at the 2014 NCWIT Summit which will take place at the Newport Beach Marriott Hotel & Spa in Newport Beach, California in May 2014.

NCWIT is a non-profit community of more than 500 prominent corporations, academic institutions, government agencies, and non-profits working to increase women’s participation in technology and computing. Their  annual NCWIT Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award recognizes U.S. Academic Alliance representatives for their outstanding mentorship, high-quality research opportunities, recruitment of women and minority students, and efforts to encourage and advance undergraduates in computing-related fields.

Apply to the UMBC Cyber Scholars Program by 14 February

Computer Engineering, Computer Science, and Information Systems majors with at least a 3.25 GPA and an interest in cybersecurity are encouraged to apply for 2014-15 cohort of the UMBC Cyber Scholars Program.

The Cyber Scholars Program is a merit-based scholarship program for talented undergraduates majoring in computer science, information systems of computer engineering who are interested in pursuing a career within the field of cybersecurity. Cyber Scholars are supported financially and incorporated into a scholarship community, unique courses, mentoring, and the chance to take part in cybersecurity research and internships during in their academic careers.

Apply by 14 February 2014 by submitting a application along with two letters of recommendation and an official college transcript.

UMBC ACM student chapter

UMBC’s ACM student chapter has a new website that will be used to announce its activities and events as well as news about computing related opportunities and resources. The chapter is open to both undergraduate and graduate students interested in computing from all majors. Joining is free and is a great way to meet other students interested in computing and to participate in activities that will help you grow as a professional.

ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is the the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society. It provides members with resources that advance computing both as a science and a profession. UMBC’s chapter meetings are open to all undergraduate and graduate students of any major. While you do not need to join ACM to be a part of the local chapter, the annual membership dues for students is only $19, heavily discounted from the non-student rate. See the ACM site for more information on student membership and its benefits.

For more information contact us at acmofficers AT lists.umbc.edu.

Council of Computing Majors to meet 12-12:45 Wed, Nov 20 in BIO LH1

MPSSL

The UMBC Council of Computing Majors (CCM) will meet from Noon to 12:45pm on Wednesday, November 20 in BIO 101 (Lecture Hall 1 in the building behind the Biology Building). The CCM is a student organization representing undergraduate computer science and computer engineering majors and anyone else with an interest in computing. Everyone is welcome.

At this meeting, students from Professor Nilanjan Banerjee’s Mobile, Pervasive and Sensor Systems Lab (MPSSL) will talk about their research. Their lab currently focuses on application areas that include renewable energy, healthcare applications and mobile phone systems as well as theoretical work on network topology compression and analytical modeling of hybrid mobile networks.

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