CSEE URM WORKSHOP & SOCIAL EVENT

Where: https://umbc.webex.com/

This is the second in a series of events that aim to build community among students from groups traditionally underrepresented in the field of computing.

Join us for an opportunity to meet, chat with, and engage fellow CSEE students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Panelists will discuss life beyond the undergraduate years.

Let’s Do This! Be Social- Virtually

Welcome Remarks– Dr. Freeman Hrabowski

Alumni Speakers

Dr. Jeff Avery, Northrup Grumman

Federico Cifuentes-Urtubey, Ph.D. student, UIUC

Dr. Patti Ordóñez, Associate Prof., UP-RP

Dr. Nwokedi Idika, Google

Kerry Luke, Northrop Grumman

CSEE Faculty Speakers

Mr. Ivan Sekyonda                          Dr. Marcella Wilson

Dr. Dmitri Perkins                             Dr. David Chapman

talk: BVOT, Self-Tallying Boardroom Voting with Oblivious Transfer; 12-1pm 11/6

 BVOT is a self-tallying boardroom voting protocol with ballot secrecy, fairness (no tally info. available before polls close), and dispute-freeness (voters can see that all voters followed the protocol).

UMBC Cyber Defense Lab

BVOT: Self-Tallying Boardroom Voting with Oblivious Transfer

Farid Javani, CSEE, UMBC

12:00–1:00pm, Friday, 6 November 2020

http://umbc.webex.com/meet/sherman

(Joint work with Alan T. Sherman)


A boardroom election is an election with a small number of voters carried out with public communications. We present BVOT, a self-tallying boardroom voting protocol with ballot secrecy, fairness (no tally information is available before the polls close), and dispute-freeness (voters can observe that all voters correctly followed the protocol).

BVOT works by using a multiparty threshold homomorphic encryption system in which each candidate is associated with a masked unique prime. Each voter engages in an oblivious transfer with an untrusted distributor: the voter selects the index of a prime associated with a candidate and receives the selected prime in a masked form. The voter then casts their vote by encrypting their masked prime and broadcasting it to everyone. The distributor does not learn the voter’s choice, and no one learns the mapping between primes and candidates until the audit phase. By hiding the mapping between primes and candidates, BVOT provides voters with insufficient information to carry out effective cheating. The threshold feature prevents anyone from computing any partial tally—until everyone has voted. Multiplying all votes, their decryption shares, and the unmasking factor yields a product of the primes each raised to the number of votes received.

In contrast to some existing boardroom voting protocols, BVOT does not rely on any zero-knowledge proof; instead, it uses oblivious transfer to assure ballot secrecy and correct vote casting. Also, BVOT can handle multiple candidates in one election. BVOT prevents cheating by hiding crucial information: an attempt to increase the tally of one candidate might increase the tally of another candidate. After all votes are cast, any party can tally the votes.

Farid Javani is a Ph.D. candidate in computer science at UMBC, working with Alan Sherman. His research interests include algorithms, security, applied cryptography, and distributed systems. He is the manager of the Enterprise Architecture team at CCC Information Services in Chicago. email:


Host: Alan T. Sherman, Support for this event was provided in part by the National Science Foundation under SFS grant DGE-1753681. The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab meets biweekly Fridays 12-1:00 pm. All meetings are open to the public. Upcoming CDL Meetings: Oct. 30, Jonathan Katz (UMCP), [possibly on secure distributed computation]; Nov. 13, TBA, [possibly: David R Imbordino (NSA), Security of the 2020 presidential election]; and Dec. 11, TBA, [possibly: Peter A. H. Peterson (Univ. of Minnesota Duluth), Adversarial Thinking]

talk: Tracking Hacking: The Disturbing Proliferation of Commercial Spyware, 1pm Oct. 23


Distinguished Speaker Series
The UMBC Center for Cybersecurity and
Dept. of Computer Science & Electrical Engineering

Tracking Hacking: The Disturbing Proliferation of Commercial Spyware

Ronald J. Deibert, Ph.D.
Prof. of Political Science, Director of Citizen Lab
Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto


1–2:00 pm Friday, 23 October 2020

Webex, Mtg. #: 120 360 5372 Password: 4ExV8dCM3J2


Political struggles in and through the global Internet and related technologies are entering into a particularly dangerous phase for openness, security, and human rights. A growing number of governments and private companies have turned to “offensive” operations, with means ranging from sophisticated and expensive to homegrown and cheap. A large and largely unregulated market for commercial surveillance technology is finding willing clientele among the world’s least accountable regimes. Powerful spyware tools are used to infiltrate civil society networks, targeting the devices of journalists, human rights defenders, minority movements, and political opposition, often with lethal consequences. Drawing from the last decade of research at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, I will provide an overview of these disturbing trends and discuss some pathways to repairing and restoring the Internet as a sphere that supports, rather than diminishes, human rights.

Ronald J. Deibert is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. The Citizen Lab undertakes interdisciplinary research at the intersection of global security, ICTs, and human rights. The research outputs of the Citizen Lab are routinely covered in global media, including over two dozen reports receiving front-page coverage in the New York Times, Washington Post, and other media over the last decade. Deibert is the author of Black Code: Surveillance, Privacy, and the Dark Side of the Internet (Random House: 2013) Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society (House of Anansi: 2020) as well as numerous books, chapters, articles, and reports on Internet censorship, surveillance, and cybersecurity. In 2013, he was appointed to the Order of Ontario and awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal, for being “among the first to recognize and take measures to mitigate growing threats to communications rights, openness and security worldwide.”

talk: Exploding Blockchain Myths, 5:30pm Tue 10/13


UMBC Data Science Meetup Talk

Exploding Blockchain Myths

Maria Vachino and Dr. James P. Howard

5:30-7:00pm Tuesday, 13 October 2020


In this talk, Maria Vachino from Easy Dynamics and Dr. James P. Howard from APL will provide an overview of what blockchain is and isn’t, focusing on non-cryptocurrency use cases, will explain the results of their research for the DHS S&T Cybersecurity Directorate, and will provide insight into the value (or lack therefore) of the technology.

References:
https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8965252/
http://jitm.ubalt.edu/XXX-3/article3.pdf

Maria Vachino is the Director of Digital Identity at Easy Dynamics where she is focused on Identity Credential & Access Management (ICAM) technologies, policies, & standards, Cybersecurity, and IT modernization for the US Federal Government. She started investigating applications for blockchain technology in 2015 as the Technical and Government Engagement Lead for the DHS S&T Cyber Security Directorate’s Identity Management Research & Development Program while a member of the Senior Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. Maria has a BS in Computer Science from UMBC and an MS in Cybersecurity.

Dr. James P. Howard, II (UMBC Ph.D. ’14) is a scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Previously, he was a consultant to numerous government agencies, including the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Executive Office of the President, and the United States Department of Homeland Security, and worked for the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System as an internal consultant on scientific computing. He is a passionate educator, teaching mathematics and statistics at the University of Maryland Global Campus since 2010 and has taught public management at Central Michigan University, Penn State, and the University of Baltimore. His most recent work has modeled the spread of infectious respiratory diseases and Ebolavirus, predicted global disruptive events, researched using blockchain for government services, and created devices for rescuing victims of building collapse. He is the author of two books.

talk: From UMBC to CEO


The Alex. Brown Center For Entrepreneurship
The Raymond V. Haysbert, Sr. Entrepreneurship Lecture Series
presents


From UMBC to CEO

Delali Dzirasa, Fearless
UMBC ‘04, BS Computer Engineering


12:00-1:00 pm Wednesday, 30 September 2020
online via Webex


Come listen to Delali, CEO and Founder of Fearless, talk about his entrepreneurial journey after he left UMBC. Every day Delali strives to make a difference in technology and in his surrounding community. He is passionate about increasing the rate of city youth heading into STEM fields and works closely with city nonprofits to provide funding and mentorship programs in city schools, as well as other educator initiatives. Fearless is a full stack digital services firm in Baltimore, Maryland with a mission to create software with a soul – tools that empower communities and make a difference. Fearless delivers sleek, modern, and user-friendly software designed to push the boundaries of possibility, to create a world where good software powers the things that matter.

Every day Delali strives to make a difference in technology and in his surrounding community. He is passionate about increasing the rate of city youth heading into STEM fields and works closely with city nonprofits to provide funding and mentorship programs in city schools, as well as other educator initiatives.

Delali Dzirasa ‘04 is the CEO and Founder, of Fearless. He received a B.S. in computer engineering from UMBC in 2004. His awards and affiliations include UMBC Outstanding Young Alumni of the Year, 2011; Board Member, Downtown Partnership of Baltimore; Board Member, UMBC College of Engineering & Information Technology; Co-Founder / Chair DevOpsDays, Baltimore; BBJ’s 40 under 40, 2017; Co-Founder, Digital Services Coalition, 2018; Co-Founder, Hack Baltimore, 2018; GBC LEADERship class of 2018; BBJ’s National List of Influential 100; Young Executives, 2018; and BBJ’s Tech 10, 2019.

For more information, see this flyer


The Raymond V. Haysbert, Sr. Entrepreneurship Lecture Series provides a platform for successful entrepreneurs to candidly share their experiences and insights with UMBC students, faculty, alumni and the Baltimore business community. The series highlights experiences, lessons learned and unique issues and challenges faced by entrepreneurs in the creation of a new enterprise.

talk: Psychometric Evaluation of the Cybersecurity Concept Inventory, 12-1 Fri 9/18


The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab presents


Psychometric Evaluation of the Cybersecurity Concept Inventory


Seth Poulsen

Computer Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

12:00noon–1pm, Friday, September 18, 2020

https://umbc.webex.com/meet/sherman

Joint work with Geoffrey Herman, Alan Sherman, Linda Oliva, Peter Peterson, Enis Golaszewski, Travis Scheponik, and Akshita Gorti.

We present a psychometric evaluation of a revised version of the Cybersecurity Concept Inventory (CCI) completed by 355 students from 29 colleges and universities. The CCI is a conceptual test of understanding created to enable research on instruction quality in cybersecurity education. This work extends previous expert review and small-scale pilot testing of the CCI. Results show that the CCI aligns with a curriculum many instructors expect from an introductory cybersecurity course, and that it is a valid and reliable tool for assessing what cybersecurity conceptual knowledge students learned.

Seth Poulsen is a PhD candidate in computer science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I’m interested in Computing Education, Programming Language design and implementation, Math Education, and any interesting intersections of the above. Previously, he was a Software Engineer at Amazon.com, working on Kindle Web Rendering and the Kindle Lite Android app. email: ,

Support for this research was provided in part by the U.S. Department of Defense under CAE-R grants H98230-15-1-0294, H98230-15-1-0273, H98230-17-1-0349, H98230-17-1-0347; and by the National Science Foundation under UMBC SFS grants DGE-1241576, 1753681, and SFS Capacity Grants DGE-1819521, 1820531. For more on the educational Cybersecurity Assessment Tools (CATS) Project: https://arxiv.org/pdf/2004.05248.pdf

Host: Alan T. Sherman,

The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab meets biweekly Fridays 12-1pm. All meetings are open to the public. Upcoming CDL Meetings:

  • Oct. 2, TBA [possibly: security of payment infrastructure]
  • Oct. 16, TBA [possibly: Jonathan Katz (GMU)]
  • Oct. 30, TBA
  • Nov. 13, TBA, [possibly: David R Imbordino (NSA), Security of the 2020 presidential election]
  • Dec. 11, TBA, [possibly: Peter A. H. Peterson (Univ. of Minnesota Duluth), Adversarial Thinking]

UMBC Data Science Meetup: Data Analytics Challenges in Healthcare


Best Practices for Handling Data Analytics Challenges in Healthcare


Aaron Wilkowitz
Customer Engineer, Healthcare & Life Sciences, Google

5:30 – 7:00 pm EDT, Tuesday, 15 September 2020
free and online; register here to get the link


Aaron specializes in Healthcare & Federal and has worked with numerous private companies & federal agencies around reaching better healthcare outcomes and minimizing fraud through smarter data. Previously Aaron worked at a predictive analytics firm APT helping Fortune 200 companies drive to better data-driven decisions.

Agenda
5:30 – 5:35 Welcome
5:35 – 6:30 Aaron Wilkowitz Talk
6:30 – 6:45 Q&A

talk: Matt Green on Privacy-Preserving Cryptographic Protocols, 12-1 EDT Fri. 9/4, online

 

The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab presents


Privacy-Preserving Cryptographic Protocols 


Professor Matthew Green
Johns Hopkins University

12:00-1:00 pm Friday, 4 September 2020
WebEx: http://umbc.webex.com/meet/sherman
  


We investigate the problem of automating the development of adaptive chosen-ciphertext attacks on systems that contain vulnerable format oracles. Rather than simply automate the execution of known attacks, we consider a more challenging problem: to programmatically derive a novel attack strategy, given only a machine-readable description of the plaintext verification function and the malleability characteristics of the encryption scheme. We present a new set of algorithms that use SAT and SMT solvers to reason deeply over the design of the system, producing an automated attack strategy that can decrypt protected messages entirely.

Matthew Green is an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute. His research includes techniques for privacy-enhanced information storage, anonymous payment systems, and bilinear map- based cryptography. He is one of the creators of the Zerocash protocol, which is used by the Zcash cryptocurrency, and a founder of an encryption startup Zeutro. He was formerly a partner in Independent Security Evaluators, a custom security evaluation and design consultancy, and currently consults independently. From 1999-2003, he served as a senior technical staff member at AT&T Laboratories/Research in Florham Park, NJ. email: Dr. Green writes a popular blog on applied cryptography, A Few Thoughts on Cryptographic Engineering, A Few Thoughts on Cryptographic Engineering


Host: Alan T. Sherman,, Support for this event was provided in part by the NSF under SFS grant DGE-1753681. The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab meets biweekly Fridays. All meetings are open to the public. Upcoming CDL Meetings:

  • The Cyber Defense Lab hosts biweekly talks on Fridays 12-1pm.

talk: Identifying and Addressing Concerning Behavior in the Digital Age, 12-1 Fri 5/8

two secret service agents confer

The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab presents

Identifying and Addressing Concerning
Behavior in the Digital Age

 

Jason W. Wells
Graduate Student, Cybersecurity MPS
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

12:00–1pm Friday, 8 May 2020, webex

 

The United States Secret Service (USSS) is widely known as the premier law enforcement agency that is charged with protecting some of the most important political figures in the world. Some of these protectees include the President of the United States, the Vice-President, the First Family and Second Family, and Heads of State visiting the United States, to name a few. A major part of the protective mission of the USSS is focused around “protective intelligence,” where agents are trained to identify concerning and threatening behavioral indicators in others, and then to address those issues in a proactive and positive manner and ensure that the community is safe from harm. This proactive methodology has been researched and applied for decades and has a very high rate of success. Now, other law enforcement agencies throughout the country have started to apply this training to their agents and officers. Can these methodologies be used and/or modified to recognize threats in cyberspace as well?


Jason Wells is a former special agent with the United States Secret Service, where he served for nine years from 2005 – 2014. During that time, Mr. Wells was extensively trained in identifying and addressing threat-related and concerning behavioral indicators, and how to address those behaviors in a positive and proactive manner. In 2016, Mr. Wells published his first book Our Path to Safety: A U.S. Secret Service Agent’s Guide to Creating Safe Communities (ISBN-13: 978-0-9982488-0-6) on how the community can identify these behavioral conditions in the same way that federal law enforcement does every day. Mr. Wells earned his undergraduate degree from the Virginia Military Institute and his first graduate degree from Henley-Putnam University in Strategic Security and Protection Management in 2014. Additionally, Mr. Wells has published 11 editorial articles in print media on improving safety and security methodologies in schools and businesses. Currently, he is an SFS scholarship graduate student at UMBC with plans to complete his degree in spring 2020. He and his wife, Blythe, have two children and have lived in Baltimore County since 2008.


Host: Alan T. Sherman, Support for this event was provided in part by the National Science Foundation under SFS grant DGE-1753681. The UMBC Cyber Defense Lab meets biweekly Fridays. All meetings are open to the public. Upcoming CDL Meetings: May 22, Spring SFS Meeting at UMBC, 9:30am-2pm, via WebEx.

talk: Cybersecurity during COVID-19 and other emergencies, 12-1 Tue May 5

talk: Cybersecurity during COVID-19 and other emergencies, 12-1 Tue May 5

The UMBC Center for Cybersecurity (UCYBR) Presents

Cybersecurity during COVID-19 and other emergencies

Dr. Richard Forno
Senior Lecturer, Computer Science & Electrical Engineering
Director, UMBC Graduate Cybersecurity Program & Assistant Director, UMBC Center for Cybersecurity

12–1 pm Tuesday, 5 May 2020
online via webex

‘Cyber’ touches many, if not all, parts of society and organizations. However, even in 2020, cybersecurity often still is seen as exclusively a function of IT and not a function of enterprise mission assurance or operational resiliency. Accordingly, operational performance can be compromised by a failure to consider, if not embrace, cybersecurity principles and concerns during crisis planning – which can significantly impede effective crisis response and incident management during actual events and make a bad situation even worse. This talk will discuss the role of cybersecurity and cybersecurity thinking within crisis management and incident handling, with a particular emphasis on maintaining operational resiliency and mission assurance during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Dr. Richard Forno is a Senior Lecturer in the UMBC Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, where he directs the UMBC Graduate Cybersecurity Program and serves as the Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity. Prior to joining UMBC in 2010, his twenty-year career in operational cybersecurity spanned the government, military, and private sector, including helping build a formal cybersecurity program for the US House of Representatives, serving as the first Chief Security Officer for Network Solutions (then, the global center of the internet DNS system), consulting to Fortune 100 companies, and more. From 2005-12 he was a Visiting Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, where he taught courses on incident handling for the CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC).

1 2 3 54