UMBC welcomes Donna Ruginski as executive director for cybersecurity initiatives

“Cybersecurity research is important because we live in a connected world. As a society, we have an expectation to conduct professional business in a safe and secure technology environment,” says Donna Ruginski, UMBC’s new executive director for cybersecurity initiatives. “Research is thriving at UMBC, and some of the nation’s leading cybersecurity research is being conducted at UMBC.”

Ruginski joins the Office of the Vice President for Research as the first campus leader to hold this partnership-focused cybersecurity role.

“I am delighted to join the UMBC community and to work with its visionary leadership and extraordinary faculty and staff,” she says. “UMBC’s capabilities and resources in cybersecurity contribute to the region’s economic development through a comprehensive cybersecurity focus on academic education, research, workforce development, technology incubators, and entrepreneurship. UMBC truly offers the complete package, making it an exciting place to be.”

Ruginski brings significant experience in cybersecurity to her new role at UMBC. She holds a master’s degree in computer science from Johns Hopkins University and has founded and served as a senior technology executive at software companies over the course of her career.

Karl V. Steiner, vice president for research at UMBC, says Ruginski’s role is important for UMBC, for Maryland, and for the United States. “UMBC is already recognized for its strength in the growing field of cybersecurity and through our strong relationships with federal agencies and the private sector,” Steiner explains. “Ruginski comes to us with an exceptional background and strong skill set that will enable our community to thrive and successfully pursue exciting new opportunities in the years to come.”

In her new role, Ruginski will work to enhance awareness of UMBC’s broad portfolio of cybersecurity initiatives and expand research partnerships with public and private organizations, says Steiner.

“Expanding cybersecurity research at UMBC will offer additional opportunities for faculty and students at all levels,” says Ruginski. “I’m excited to supportUMBC’s growing reputation as a leading research institution.”

Adapted from a UMBC News story by Megan Hanks. Photo of Donna Ruginski by Marlayna Demond ’11 for UMBC.

talk: Security for Smart Cyber-Physical Systems, 12-1 5/3, ITE 227

UMBC Cyber Defense Lab

Security for Smart Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Anupam Joshi, UMBC

12:00–1:00pm, Friday, 3 May 2019, ITE 227

Smart Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are increasingly embedded in our everyday life. Security incidents involving them are often high-profile because of their ability to control critical infrastructure. Stuxnet and the Ukrainian power-grid attack are some notorious attacks reported against CPS which impacted governmental programs to ordinary users. In addition to the deliberate attacks, device malfunction and human error can also result in incidents with grave consequences. Hence the detection and mitigation of abnormal behaviors resulting from security incidents is imperative for the trustworthiness and broader acceptance of smart cyber-physical systems. We propose an automatic behavioral abstraction technique, ABATe, which automatically learns their typical behavior by finding the latent “context” space using available operational data and is used to discern anomalies. We evaluate our technique using two real-world datasets (a sewage water treatment plant dataset and an automotive dataset) to demonstrate the multi-domain adaptability and efficacy of our approach.

Anupam Joshi is the Oros Family Professor and Chair of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County(UMBC). He is the Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity, and one of the USM leads for the National Cybersecurity FFRDC. He is a Fellow of IEEE. Dr. Joshi obtained a B.Tech degree from IIT Delhi in 1989, and a Masters and Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1991 and 1993 respectively. His research interests are in the broad area of networked computing and intelligent systems. His primary focus has been on data management and security/privacy in mobile/pervasive computing environments, and policy driven approaches to security and privacy. He is also interested in Semantic Web and Data/Text/Web Analytics, especially their applications to (cyber) security. He has published over 250 technical papers with an h-index of 79 and over 23,250 citations (per Google scholar), filed and been granted several patents, and has obtained research support from National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), US Dept of Defense (DoD), NIST, IBM, Microsoft, Qualcom, Northrop Grumman, and Lockheed Martin amongst others

talk: Data-driven Approach for Sustainable Smart Cities, 11am 5/6, ITE 459, UMBC

Information Systems Spring 2019 Distinguished Lecture on Sustainable Smart Cities

A Data-driven Approach for Sustainable Smart Cities

Prof. Prashant Shenoy, University of Massachusetts

11:00am Monday, 6 May 2019, ITE 459, UMBC

Recent technological advances have enabled deployments of pervasive sensing and actuation in our physical world, which has led to the emergence of cyber-physical systems where computing and sensing interact with the physical world and humans in unique and exciting ways. Such systems are increasingly being deployed in smart city domains such as energy, transportation, health, grids, and agriculture.

In this talk, I will argue that the rich and vast amounts of data generated by smart city applications necessitate a data-driven approach where AI and systems techniques are employed in a symbiotic manner to tackle smart city challenges. I will present two smart city applications from the energy domain as examples of such a symbiotic approach. I will first present WattHome, a city-scale machine-learning-based approach that can determine the least efficient buildings within a large city or region. I will present the results of a city-scale evaluation performed in collaboration with a local utility, where WattHome successfully identified causes of energy inefficiency for thousands of buildings. Second, I will present SolarClique, a sensor-less data-driven approach that is designed to detect anomalies in power generation of large number of existing solar sites without requiring any additional sensor instrumentation. I will conclude my talk by describing a number of open challenges in designing data-driven approaches for smart cities.

Prashant Shenoy is currently a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He received the B.Tech degree in Computer Science and Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay and the M.S and Ph.D degrees in Computer Science from the University of Texas, Austin. His research interests lie in distributed systems and networking, with a recent emphasis on cloud and green computing. He has been the recipient of several best paper awards at leading conferences, including a Sigmetrics Test of Time Award. He serves on editorial boards of the several journals and has served as the program chair of over a dozen ACM and IEEE conferences. He is a fellow of the IEEE and the AAAS and a distinguished member of the ACM.

talk: Using CPSA to Analyze Force-Latency Protocols, 12-1 4/19

UMBC Cyber Defense Lab

Using CPSA to Analyze Force-Latency Protocols

Dr. Edward Zieglar, National Security Agency

12-1 Friday, 19 April 19, ITE 227

Several cryptographic protocols have been proposed to address the Man-in-the-Middle attack without the prior exchange of keys. This talk will describe a formal analysis of one such protocol proposed by Zooko Wilcox-O’Hearn, the forced-latency defense against the chess grandmaster attack. Using the Cryptographic Protocol Shapes Analyzer (CPSA), we validate the security properties of the protocol through the novel use of CPSA’s state features to represent time. We also describe a small message space attack that highlights how assumptions made in protocol design can affect the security of a protocol in use, even for a protocol with proven security properties.

Edward Zieglar is a security researcher in the Research Directorate of the National Security Agency, where he concentrates on formal analysis and verification of cryptographic protocols and network security. He is also an adjunct professor at UMBC where he teaches courses in networking and network security. He received his master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from UMBC.

Host: Alan T. Sherman,

IBM Watson Cloud Academy Workshop, 9-5 May 3

IBM Cloud Academy Workshop

9am-5pm Friday, May 3, 2019

UMBC will host an all-day IBM Watson Cloud Academy Workshop 9am-5pm on May 3 taught by Prof. Anand Singh of NCSU. All faculty, students and staff are welcome to attend. We also welcome government and industry partners. Register for the free workshop here.

The workshop will provide hands-on training on many of the IBM Watson, analytics and IoT cloud services that can be used in support of a wide-range of AI/cognitive-based research projects and curricula. It will also provide use cases of many typical biomedical, engineering and other problems that can be solved using these technologies.

The workshop will end with a project planning clinic, whereby faculty can discuss proposed projects. To prepare for this hands-on workshop, participants should obtain a free IBM Cloud trial accounts and review the educational modules/material as outlined below:

  • Obtain a free IBM Cloud trial account (that will provide you with free access to a subset of Watson services).
  • Click on Watson and then select Cloud Access and then follow the directions to get your free account.
  • Go to the free Educator Guides page
  • Review the material for the “Updated Watson Education Guide” and complete the Lab and Exercises.
  • Go to the Watson Academic Engagement page and go through the “Application Starter Kit”, “API Documentation,” and “Watson on Github” and other material there.
  • Go to the IBM Watson Academy page and go through the material under “IBM Watson and Cloud Platform”, especially material on NLP, Dialog, Assistant, Discovery and Watson Knowledge Studios.

Register for the free workshop here.

Post-Bac Certificate in Digital Forensics

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Professional Studies: Digital Forensics

UMBC’s cybersecurity graduate program has added a new 12-credit post-baccalaureate certificate in professional studies focused on digital forensics.

The Digital Forensics certificate program is intended for early and mid-career IT and law- enforcement professionals who want to learn basic and advanced concepts and develop skills in the field of computer forensics. Students will understand the role of digital/computer forensics as a subspecialty of cybersecurity. Through firsthand experience using industry-standard forensic tools, techniques, and procedures in the digital forensic process, students will understand the incident-handling process, the special rules of evidence that apply to cybercrime investigations (i.e., chain of custody, search and seizure, forensic imaging), and the relevant state, federal, and/or regulatory frameworks governing such activities within different industry sectors (such as defense, healthcare, and financial services). The four-course, 12-credit certificate can be applied toward obtaining the MPS in Cybersecurity degree.

  • CYBR 620 Intro to Cybersecurity or CMSC equivalent (i.e., CMSC 626, CMSC 687)
  • CYBR 641 Computer Crime Investigations
  • CYBR 642 Introduction to Digital Forensics
  • CYBR 643 Advanced Digital Forensics

CSEE at Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement Day

CSEE students at UMBC’s 23nd Annual Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement Day

Congratulations to the 49 undergraduate majors from our computer engineering and computer science programs who are presenting their research at the 23nd Annual Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement Day on Wednesday, 24 April 2019.
  • Devon Adams | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Development Of An Autonomous Vehicle For The Micromouse Competition
    Mentor(s): E F Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Aileiwaer Airexiati | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Development Of An Autonomous Vehicle For The Micromouse Competition
    Mentor(s): E F Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Rashed Mohamed Salem Ali Alhefeiti | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Development Of An Autonomous Vehicle For The Micromouse Competition
    Mentor(s): E F Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Ahmed Ali Almehrzi | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Micromouse-X : UMBC Capstone Project
    Mentor(s): E.F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Trevor Ancona | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Ryan Apt | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Development Of An Autonomous Vehicle For The Micromouse Competition
    Mentor(s): E F Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Courtney Bohn | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Creating A Quadruped Robot With Walking And Wheeled Capabilities
    Mentor(s): Fow-Sen Choa
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Cameron Blomquist | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Maxwell Breitmeyer | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Virtual Reality And Photogrammetry For Improved Reproducibility Of Human-Robot Interaction Studies
    Mentor(s): Don Engel
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Elwin Brown | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Thirst: A Quest To Restore The Oasis
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Elwin Brown | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Toward The Application Of SVM’s For Text-Based Replication Of CATME Peer Evaluations
    Mentor(s): Don Engel
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Erin Cannon | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Thirst: A Quest To Restore The Oasis
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Noah Carver | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Modular Solvers For Partially Continuous Abstract Markov Decision Processes
    Mentor(s): Cynthia Matuszek
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Dan Castellano | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Brain Guitar-Pedal Interface
    Mentor(s): E. F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | Time
  • Caroline Cocca | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Investigating Teamwork Quality Through Neural Networks And Text Analysis
    Mentor(s): Don Engel
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Adam Der | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Fabrication Of A Wearable Temperature Sensing System For CIPA Patients
    Mentor(s): Gymama Slaughter
    UC 312 | 3:45 – 4 p.m.
  • Debora Diaz Diestra | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Micromouse-X : UMBC Capstone Project
    Mentor(s): E.F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Anthony Ellis | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Carllie Foley | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Escape To Planet Earth
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Charles Fox | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Investigating Teamwork Quality Through Neural Networks And Text Analysis
    Mentor(s): Don Engel
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Jaylan Hall | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Creating A Quadruped Robot With Walking And Wheeled Capabilities
    Mentor(s): Fow-Sen Choa
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Edward Hanson | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Brain Guitar-Pedal Interface
    Mentor(s): E. F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Brian D. Hanson, Jr. | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Fabrication Of A Wearable Temperature Sensing System For CIPA Patients
    Mentor(s): Gymama Slaughter
    UC 312 | 3:45 – 4 p.m.
  • Kit Heckman | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Phillip Hilliard | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Annotating And Predicting Contextual Sentiment In Text
    Mentor(s): Frank Ferraro
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Mark Horton | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Brain Guitar-Pedal Interface
    Mentor(s): E. F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Mark Horton | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Autoencoder Implementation For Embedded Reinforcement Learning
    Mentor(s): Tinoosh Mohsenin
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Ben Ireland | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Atmospheric Lidar Group DATA: Distributed Systems & Cyber-Security Of Remote Sensing Profiling Network Testbed
    Mentor(s): Ruben Delgado
    UC 312 | 4 – 4:15 p.m.
  • Zachary Jones | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Brain Guitar-Pedal Interface
    Mentor(s): E. F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Thomas Kohler | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Micromouse-X : UMBC Capstone Project
    Mentor(s): E.F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Alex Leger | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Josh Ludlow | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Lucas McCullum | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Development Of An Autonomous Vehicle For The Micromouse Competition
    Mentor(s): E F Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Andrew McLamb | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Escape To Planet Earth
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Stephanie Milani | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    A Hierarchical Framework For Norm-Aware Planning And Reinforcement Learning
    Mentor(s): Marie desJardins
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Shawn Oppermann | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Nicholas Potteiger | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Archiving Workflows In Cloud Based Storage
    Mentor(s): Douglas Thain
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Ben Przysucha | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Zhou Qin | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Micromouse-X : UMBC Capstone Project
    Mentor(s): E.F. Charles LaBerge
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Brendan Robison | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Wizards
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Shea Sandifer | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Matthew Schweiss | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Creating A Quadruped Robot With Walking And Wheeled Capabilities
    Mentor(s): Fow-Sen Choa
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Danielle Sherrod | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Creating A Quadruped Robot With Walking And Wheeled Capabilities
    Mentor(s): Fow-Sen Choa
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Levan Sulimanov | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Virtual Reality Mirror Therapy Rehabilitation For Post-Stroke Patients
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Danilo Symonette | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Toward The Application Of SVM’s For Text-Based Replication Of CATME Peer Evaluations
    Mentor(s): Don Engel
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Jordan Troutman | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Understanding Machine Learning Bias Without A Ground Truth
    Mentor(s): Anand Sarwate
    UC Ballroom | 10 – 11:30 a.m.
  • Liam Upton | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    UMBC Game Developers Club 2018-2019 Game Projects
    Mentor(s): Marc Olano
    UC Ballroom Lounge | 10 – Noon
  • Jenna Westfall | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Automatization Of Characterization Of Atmospheric Particles With Machine Learning
    Mentor(s): Ruben Delgado
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Brendan Witt | Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
    Using Augmented Reality And Smart Home Devices to Better Sense Users
    Mentor(s): Reynold Bailey
    UC Ballroom | 1 – 2:30 p.m.

talk: Why are memory-corruption bugs still a thing?, 10:30am Mon 4/8, ITE325

Why are memory-corruption bugs still a thing?

The challenges of securing software at an assembly level

Doug Britton
CTO, RunSafe Security Inc.

10:30-11:30 Monday, 8 April 2019, ITE346

Methods to chip away at the danger of memory-corruption bugs have been available for some time.  Why has the going-price of memory-corruption-based exploits not spiked?  If the methods were have a broad-based result in mitigating exploit vectors, there would be a reduction in supply, causing an increase in prices.  Also, there would be a reduction in the pool of people qualified to develop zero-days, allowing them to push the prices up.  The data suggest that prices have remained generally stable and attackers are able to move with impunity.  What are the challenges to large-scale adoption of memory-corruption based mitigation methods. 


Doug Britton serves as Chief Technology Officer and Director of RunSafe Security, Inc. Mr. Britton Co-founded Kaprica Security, Inc., in 2011 and serves as its Chief Executive Officer. Prior to his leadership role in Kaprica, Mr. Britton was a cyber-security focused research and development manager at Lockheed Martin. He has an MBA and MS from University of Maryland and a BS in Computer Science from the University of Illinois.

SFS cyberdefense scholarship applications due April 15

SFS cyberdefense scholarship applications due Noon Monday, April 15

The next application deadline for SFS cyberdefense scholarships at UMBC is 12:00 noon Monday, 15 April 2019, for possible scholarships beginning in the fall of 2019. See the Center for Information Security and Assurance site for details and application forms.

These major scholarships include tuition, generous stipend, and more, in return for government employment. Applicants must have at least junior status in fall 2019. BS, MS, MPS, PhD in any cyber-related field may apply (CS, CE, EE, IS, Cyber, and possibly others). SFS applicants must be citizens or lawful permanent residents capable of obtaining a secret clearance at federal, state, local, or tribal government. The annual stipends are $25,000 undergraduate and $34,000 graduate; in addition, each scholar will receive $6000 per year in professional development funds.

The scholarships are highly competitive (e.g., the median GPA of current SFS scholars at UMBC is 3.8) and favor students who have excelled in upper-level technical courses and who have demonstrated a passion and talent for cybersecurity through relevant accomplishments. We will consider applications from rising juniors and above with GPA over 3.0. All SFS scholars at UMBC are expected to engage in cohort and research activities. UMBC is in the first year of a five -year, $5 million NSF grant, which will support 34 students. For more information, see the SFS FAQ page.

Interested students should contact

Dr. Alan T. Sherman
Professor of Computer Science
Director, UMBC Center for Information Security and Assurance (CISA)

talk: Learning to Ground Instructions to Plans, 2:30 Thr 3/21, ITE346

Learning to Ground Natural Language Instructions to Plans

Nakul Gopalan, Brown University

2:30-3:30pm Thursday, 21 March 2019, ITE 346, UMBC

In order to easily and efficiently collaborate with humans, robots must learn to complete tasks specified using natural language. Natural language provides an intuitive interface for a layperson to interact with a robot without the person needing to program a robot, which might require expertise. Natural language instructions can easily specify goal conditions or provide guidances and constraints required to complete a task. Given a natural language command, a robot needs to ground the instruction to a plan that can be executed in the environment. This grounding can be challenging to perform, especially when we expect robots to generalize to novel natural language descriptions and novel task specifications while providing as little prior information as possible. In this talk, I will present a model for grounding instructions to plans. Furthermore, I will present two strategies under this model for language grounding and compare their effectiveness. We will explore the use of approaches using deep learning, semantic parsing, predicate logic and linear temporal logic for task grounding and execution during the talk.

Nakul Gopalan is a graduate student in the H2R lab at Brown University. His interests are in the problems of language grounding for robotics, and abstractions within reinforcement learning and planning. He has an MSc. in Computer Science from Brown University (2015) and an MSc. in Information and Communication Engineering from T.U. Darmstadt (2013) in Germany. He completed a Bachelor of Engineering from R.V. College of Engineering in Bangalore, India (2008). His team recently won the Brown-Hyundai Visionary Challenge for their proposal to use Mixed Reality and Social Feedback for Human-Robot collaboration.

Host: Prof. Cynthia Matuszek (cmat at umbc.edu)

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