Marie desJardins Quotidian Quotes

University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-3967
Fax: (410) 455-3969
Office: ITE 337
mariedj @ cs.umbc.edu

Also affiliated with the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computing Studies (UMIACS), UMBC's Bioinformatics Research Center, Women in Science and Engineering, and the Center for Women in Information Technology

This page has been translated into German! (I make no guarantees as to accuracy or currency.)

My Opinion

"The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest."
--Thomas Jefferson, "Rights of British America"

I've moved my opinion to my blog (yes, that's right, I've decided to join the 21st century..but slowly!)

You may be able to infer some of my opinions from my "Quotidian Quotes" (upper right of the page).

Peace.

visited 30 countries (13.2%)
Clearly, I need to visit more (any) countries below the Equator...
visited 40 states (44 if you count driving through them...) (80%) visited 7 provinces (53.8%)

Create your own visited countries map!

Office Hours

I am on leave for the 2014-15 academic year, and will not be holding regular office hours. I will be traveling frequently, but you can send me email if you would like to meet with me, and I'll let you know what is possible.

Any time my door is open, you should feel free to interrupt me. (If I am actually too busy to talk just then, I will try to let you know politely!) If my door is ajar, you should knock if it's important. If my door is closed, please knock only for urgent matters. I am also happy to meet with students by appointment, and I try to respond to e-mail within 24 hours.


Curriculum Vita

Here's my current c.v. in
PDF format.

Research: MAPLE

My research is in artificial intelligence. My current research interests are in planning, learning, and multiagent systems. My research group is called MAPLE (Multi-Agent Planning and LEarning).  You can find more information about MAPLE, including research areas, students, and publications, at the MAPLE web page.

Teaching

Spring 2014 - CMSC 471 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Fall 2013 - CMSC 101 / IS 101Y (Computational Thinking and Design)
Spring 2013 - CMSC 304 (Social and Ethical Issues in Information Technology)
Fall 2012 - CMSC 100 (Introduction to Computers and Programming)
Spring 2012 - CMSC 601 (Research Skills for Computer Scientists)
Spring 2012 - HONR 300/CMSC 491H (Computation, Complexity, and Emergence)
Fall 2011 - CMSC 471 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Fall 2011 - CMSC 100H (Introduction to Computers and Programming - Honors Discussion Section)
Spring 2011 - HONR 300/CMSC 491H (Computation, Complexity, and Emergence)
Fall 2010 - CMSC 100H (Introduction to Computers and Programming - Honors Discussion Section)
Fall 2010 - CMSC 671 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Fall 2009 - CMSC 100/100H (Introduction to Computers and Programming)
Fall 2009 - CMSC 471 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Spring 2009 - CMSC 601 (Research Skills for Computer Scientists)
Spring 2009 - CMSC 691P (Teaching Computer Science I in Python)
Fall 2008 - CMSC 100/100H (Introduction to Computers and Programming)
Fall 2007 / Spring 2008 - On sabbatical
Spring 2007 - CMSC 477/677 (Agent Architectures and Multi-Agent Systems)
Fall 2006 - CMSC 201 (Computer Science I for Majors)
Spring 2006 - CMSC 691B (Basic Research Skills)
Fall 2005 - CMSC 671 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Spring 2005 - CMSC 477/677 (Agent Architectures and Multi-Agent Systems)
Fall 2004 - CMSC 471 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Spring 2004 - CMSC 691B (Basic Research Skills)
Fall 2003 - CMSC 671 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence); CMSC 691E (Emergence; enrollment by permission only)
Spring 2003 - CMSC 491M/691M (Agent Architectures and Multi-Agent Systems).
Fall 2002 - CMSC 203 (Discrete Structures), CMSC 471 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)
Spring 2002 - CMSC 691M, (Agent Architectures and Multi-Agent Systems)
Fall 2001 - CMSC 671 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence)

Other Stuff

Language Learning/Option Discovery Talk

These are the slides from a talk that I gave about the "Commands" language learning and option/subgoal discovery project, in several venues in Fall 2014.

AAAI-13 Reviewing Panel

These are the slides from the panel on "Reviewing Best Practices" that
Michael Littman and I organized at AAAI-13:

If I'd Only Known!

Answers to followup questions from the "If I'd Only Known!" panel for junior faculty that was held at the 2012 Grace Hopper conference are posted here.

History of the AAAI/SIGART Doctoral Consortium

I've been involved wih the AAAI/SIGART Doctoral Consortium since 2000. It's a great event for grad students midway in their careers to present their proposed dissertation research to established researchers, receive feedback, and network with each other. Kiri Wagstaff and I have put together a brief history of the students and mentors who have been involved with the program.

Writing Tips

Here's a document that I put together, with standard editing symbols, my own cryptic editing abbreviations, and my list of "pet writing peeves." If you write anything for me, please read these first -- and consider yourself forewarned!

How to Succeed in Graduate School

I wrote a paper full of advice for graduate students and advisors, and I hope you find it interesting! It has been translated into Ukrainian (by All Science Magazine).

I've also written a short document with some advice on how to organize a workshop that you might find useful. (You can also view a Romanian translation, courtesy of azoft.) A few years ago, I gave a short talk to the MAPLE research group on Presenting your research: Papers, talks and chats.

The slides that I presented at the Fall 2003 UMBC CS&EE graduate student orientation are here.

The complete (including hidden) slides from my July 2005 presentation on "Presenting Your Research:Papers, Presentations, and People" at the AAAI/SIGART Doctoral Consortium are here.

Here are some really useful tips for new teachers (aimed at TAs, but useful for new faculty too!).

Links for students

A collection of links about jobs, fellowships, internships, and generally useful advice. Hopelessly out of date, but you may find something worthwhile.

ICML-03 Mini-Tutorial

Rob Holte, Rob Schapire, and I gave a mini-tutorial at ICML-03 on "The Three R's of Publishing Machine Learning Papers: Research, 'Riting, and Reviews." Here are links to my slides, Rob Holte's slides on reviewing and experimental methodologies, and Rob Schapire's slides on writing and formal methods.

Browsing Area

Some funny and serious stuff I've collected over the years. (I didn't write most of these items. I take no responsibility for their content, but full responsibility for my sense of humor and political leanings.) There are also a few favorite recipes here.
 
Marie desJardins, mariedj @ cs.umbc.edu